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Mon, Mar 05 2012 post by Susie From frugalskate.blogspot

Hamentash Challah

This special Challah for the Jewish holiday called Purim is shaped into a triangle like a traditional Hamentash and filled with preserves. Purim is a time of celebration and good will. ...

Hamentash Challah for Purim

Purim is on its way!  For those of you unfamiliar with the happiest holiday on the Jewish calendar (March 8th this year), Purim is a time of merriment and gratitude.  Jews celebrate Purim by gathering together to read the Scroll of Esther, which recounts the miracle of Purim: the victory of Queen Esther and Mordechai over the evil Haman and King Achashverosh 2,400 years ago.

Children (and many adults!) dress up in costumes, and do a sort of reverse trick-or-treating...instead of asking for sweets, they give out baskets of goodies to their friends and neighbors, and distribute donations to the poor. There is a general air of happiness and celebration.  We end the holiday with a large communal meal called Seudat Purim where there is a great deal of eating, singing, and dancing.

Like almost all Jewish holidays, we have certain customary foods associated with Purim.  One of them is a delicious dessert called a “Hamentash” (or in Hebrew "oznai-Haman"), a triangular pastry that is loaded with jelly or (my favorite) poppy seeds.  Here are some delicious Hamentash pastries that were baked by my friend, Amy.

For years now, I've been making a Rhodes challah that is shaped like a Hamentash for the Purim meal, filled with a few different flavors of preserves or jam.  Thanks to the even consistency of Rhodes dough, this special challah is simple to make and delicious to eat.

Let Rhodes help your family celebrate Purim with our Rhodes Dough.

Photo credit: Amy Gottleib Shuter

 

 

The only ingredients for the Hamentash challah will be one defrosted loaf from a package of Rhodes dough, between 1 to 4 different jams and preserves, cooking spray, and a beaten egg for basting.  You'll need a pan or cookie sheet to bake it in, a dough board, and a rolling pin.

Spray the pan or cookie sheet with cooking spray.  Pre-heat the oven to 300 degrees.  The reason we are going to bake this at a low temperature is because the sugars in the jams and preserves tend to cook more quickly than the dough, so we’ll bake this at a lower temperature for a slightly longer time.

Shape the loaf of Rhodes dough into a ball.  Flatten and roll out on the board until you've got a nice round flat.  Very important:  don't roll it too thin – 3/4" to 1" thick should be just right. If it gets any thinner than that, the dough will tear.

Let Rhodes help your family celebrate Purim with our Rhodes Dough.

 

 

Fill the center of the dough with anywhere from 1 to 4 different kinds of preserves.  It's perfectly fine if the different flavors mingle.  Use flavors that go well with bread. I used just two flavors, orange marmalade and strawberry preserves (pictured here is the marmalade). Though it’s tempting, don’t use too much filling or you’ll have a mess on your hands. 

This part is crucial:  keep the filling in the center of the dough.  If the filling spreads out near the edges, you won't be able to fold and pinch the dough closed.

Let Rhodes help your family celebrate Purim with our Rhodes Dough.

 

 

Now comes the only part of this recipe that's a little tricky as we’re going to have to do some shaping, but Rhodes’ perfectly consistent texture makes it easier to manipulate the dough into the shape we want.

Move the dough to a surface that’s easy to work with, like a large cutting board. Taking one-third at a time, carefully fold up each edge of the flat toward the center.  Make sure no filling touches the edges of the dough as you are folding it up, or they won’t stick together. Give the edges a good strong pinch and crimp, as if you were sealing a pie.  The filling will get hot in the oven and try to bubble and force its way out of the dough, so it's really important to start out with a nearly-completely sealed Hamentash shape.  You want to leave a tiny space in the center for the jam to poke out.  If you’ve closed it up well enough, the dough will merely stretch in the oven, keeping most of the jam inside.

Let Rhodes help your family celebrate Purim with our Rhodes Dough.

Let Rhodes help your family celebrate Purim with our Rhodes Dough.

 

 

Give the Hamentash loaf a quick spritz of cooking spray on top to keep it from drying out and cover it with a clean dish towel.  Let the dough rise for about 20 minutes, but check on it at 10 to make sure the edges haven't come unpinched. If they have, pinch them back together really tightly.

Let Rhodes help your family celebrate Purim with our Rhodes Dough.

 

 

Baste the top of the challah with the beaten egg, and transfer it to the greased pan. Pop it in the hot oven and bake for about 30 minutes (check it at 20). The jam or preserves should be bubbling out the center of the challah, like a Hamentash pastry.  Delicious.  You’ll want to serve this Hamentash challah slightly warm.

Let Rhodes help your family celebrate Purim with our Rhodes Dough.

You can have this challah at your Purim Seudah (festive meal) or on the special Shabbat that comes before Purim called Shabbos Zachor.  (Please note that this challah should not be used for lechem mishneh.)

Here's wishing all of my fellow Rhodes-loving friends a very happy, joyous, freilichin Purim!

Print

Hamentash Challah

Servings: 12 | Skills: Intermediate | Prep Time: 30 min (not including thaw time) | Bake Time: 30 min

Hamentash Challah
5.0 / 5  (2 votes, 2 reviews )

Ingredients

12 Rhodes Dinner Rolls, thawed
1 to 4 different jams and preserves
cooking spray
a beaten egg for basting

Instructions

Roll Rolls into a 4-6 inch circle. (Do not roll too thin)
Fill the center of the dough with anywhere from 1 to 4 different kinds of preserves.  It's perfectly fine if the different flavors mingle.  Use flavors that go well with bread.
keep the filling in the center of the dough.  If the filling spreads out near the edges, you won't be able to fold and pinch the dough closed.
Move the dough to a surface that’s easy to work with, like a large cutting board. Taking one-third at a time, carefully fold up each edge of the flat toward the center.  Make sure no filling touches the edges of the dough as you are folding it up, or they won’t stick together. Give the edges a good strong pinch and crimp, as if you were sealing a pie.  The filling will get hot in the oven and try to bubble and force its way out of the dough, so it's really important to start out with a nearly-completely sealed Hamentash shape.  You want to leave a tiny space in the center for the jam to poke out.  If you’ve closed it up well enough, the dough will merely stretch in the oven, keeping most of the jam inside. Cover with sprayed plastic wrap, Let the dough rise for about 20 minutes. Make sure the edges haven't come un-pinched. If they have, pinch them back together really tightly.
Baste the top of the challah with the beaten egg, and transfer it to the greased pan. Pop it in the hot oven and bake for about 30 minutes (check it at 20). The jam or preserves should be bubbling out the center of the challah, like a Hamentash pastry.  Delicious.  You’ll want to serve this Hamentash challah slightly warm.


2 Comments

Madeline said on Mar 05, 2012
use to get coupons for this Bread and Rolls but seem never to get them anymore. Where can I find them
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